Good Posture Is Much More Than Looking Good – 8 Daily Exercises To Help You With Your Posture

Regency Clinic Tips & Advice 0 Comments

We learn to sit up when we are only a few months old and instinctively, we know how to sit well.  But, unfortunately not for long!  For whatever reason – most likely watching our parents/others – we lose this ability and slouching becomes the norm.

We learn to sit up when we are only a few months old and instinctively, we know how to sit well.  But, unfortunately not for long!  For whatever reason – most likely watching our parents/others – we lose this ability and slouching becomes the norm.  

People often notice someone with good posture, because it stands out as unusual.  Whereas take us back a few decades and good deportment was very important.  Did anyone else have to walk around school with a book on their head?

Joking aside, learning what is good posture and how to maintain it will benefit you in so many ways. By strengthening your core and upper back, you will be able to carry and hold yourself correctly.  It will give you a presence, make you look taller and slimmer and even reflect confidence and energy levels.  But beyond this and most importantly, it is good for your spine and body. Posture is the position you hold your body in when standing, sitting and lying down – so there is no getting away from it.  To maintain good posture, you should be holding yourself in a way that puts the least pressure/strain on your back and limbs, whatever you are doing.

Good posture will reduce the chance of injury and musculoskeletal problems.  This is because you are:

 

• Keeping the natural curves in your spine

 

• Reducing the stress on your spinal joints, surrounding/supporting musculature

• Keeping your joints mobile and in alignment, so not over developing on one side

• Enabling your body to be strong and flexible with all joints moving freely

• As well as giving your internal organs more space

Areas often affected by poor posture: neck, upper back and ribs, shoulders, and lower back.

Here are a few exercises to help alleviate tightness and promote good posture.  NB For strength building, it is advisable to seek assistance from a professional – such as a Personal Trainer, physiotherapist or join a Pilates class.

1)Chin Tuck https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/neck-and-shoulder-stretches/

Looking directly ahead, drop the chin slightly so that your neck is in a neutral position.  Then tuck your chin backwards towards your neck (drawing back, not dropping it), keep facing forward.

2) Traps https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/neck-and-shoulder-stretches/

Spine Twist

Looking straight ahead, gently pull your head to the side (ear to shoulder).  Feel the stretch directly down the side of the neck.

3) Spine Twist https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/upper-back-and-chest-stretches/

Sitting straight and tall, slowly twist your upper body around to the side as far as you can go, take a deep breath there before returning to the centre and turning the other way.  You are mobilising and stretching through the back.

4) Pecs https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/upper-back-and-chest-stretches/

Standing in a doorway.  Take one arm out to the side at shoulder height.  Pressing the forearm against the wall/frame (so it is in full contact shown in image), step forwards, opening up the chest and stretching across the front of the shoulder and chest.

5) Rhomboids https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/upper-back-and-chest-stretches/

Standing, facing a wall.  Place hand flat against the wall at shoulder height.  Gently push back through the shoulder blades (the shoulder blades will come forwards and you will feel a stretch between them).

6) Pelvic tilt https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/back-strengthening-mobility-exercises/

Sitting tall, hips directly vertical, slowly tilt hips forwards (causing more curvature at the bottom of the spine) and backwards (flattening the back and opening the vertebrae) – gently mobilising and stretching the lower back.

7) Piriformis https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/glutes-stretch/

Seated – cross ankle over opposite thigh, knee out to the side.  Lean directly forward gently until you feel a stretch in the buttock.

8) Glute med https://www.regency-clinic.co.uk/exercise/glutes-stretch/ 

Seated – cross your legs, then pull top knee up / across the body towards opposite shoulder.

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